Everything You Should Know About Diabetic Retinopathy


Most doctors recommend that diabetic patients often visit an eye specialist and must treat their eyes. The reason is that people who suffer from diabetes are more prone to loss of vision or suffer from eye disease compared to healthy people.

Diabetic retinopathy

Diabetes is a medical condition that affects people of various ages. Anyone, from the ages of 20 to 74, can suffer from high blood sugar levels and need insulin to keep levels low. You can browse https://www.drdorioeyecare.com/ if you're looking for an eye specialist for the treatment of diabetic retinopathy.

Diabetic retinopathy, which is a major cause of eye problems and blindness in diabetic patients, is a condition in which the eyes become damaged without prior warning signs. This condition worsens rapidly, causing total blindness and loss of vision in one or both eyes.

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Damage can only be controlled if problems are detected in time. This is why diabetic patients are recommended to visit an ophthalmologist for frequently scheduled eye examinations; so that any sudden damage to the eye that may not be seen by the individual, will be detected by the doctor who will treat the condition.

Even though patients with Type 1 Diabetes are more likely to suffer from retinopathy, it is recommended that each Type 2 patient does not underestimate this condition and visit an ophthalmologist for a routine examination.

Eye Care for Diabetes Patients

In general, diabetic patients need to:

  • Schedule regular eye care appointments.
  • Maintain their blood sugar at a stable level.
  • Keep their blood pressure under control.
  • Aims to reduce cholesterol levels.
  • Eat healthy food.
  • Quit smoking.
  • Exercise regularly.

In addition, diabetic patients should immediately visit an eye specialist if they suffer from blurred vision, black spots in front of their eyes or flashes of light. An ophthalmologist must also be consulted in cases where partial or complete loss of vision occurs in one of the two eyes.